Prehistoric astronomy - The backbone of the wonder tales

(a subgroup of fairy tales)

 

The German term for fairy tales, Märchen, implies that these tales contain a Mär, a message. The message is neatly tucked away in the tales’ prehistoric worldview. It conveys ancient matriarchal values, as well as astronomical knowledge. Thus, the fairy tales speak of natural laws and a life in harmony with all beings. All is interrelated and our tangible world is constantly shaped and re-shaped by an intangible world, which lies behind a sort of veil. Our Neolithic ancestors, the creators of the  wonder tales, considered the cosmic influence of the two main lights, the Sun and the Moon, as part of the creative energy behind the veil that helps to shape the world. They believed it to be so important that they established a calendar with equal emphasis on the Sun and the Moon to live by. With the help of huge stones, megaliths, they built circles and monuments that helped them compute the Sun and Moon’s cyclical dance. Then they condensed their know-how into stories – our European wonder tales. These stories have been told and re-told for ages, up to this very day. These tales are thus our indigenous wisdom stories, stories that lie at the very root of our culture. 

 Would you have thought that your beloved childhood tale contains such ancient and universal wisdom? 


An observer on the face of the Earth gets to witness an elegant dance of the Sun and the Moon up in the sky. Their energies move in a well-balanced cyclical relationship, causing together all growth on Earth. However, using today’s calendar, which favors the Sun over the Moon does not allow for the integration of both solar and lunar cycles. It entirely dismisses the lunar cycles and thus disconnects the month from its actual cosmic length. This again has vast consequences, because it separates our awareness and no longer allows a life in harmony with the cosmic order. 

Not considering the cycles as they are occurring in the

sky means forfeiting that chance to co-weave destiny and promotes a  passive watching of a solo artist up in the sky, the Sun, dancing all to  himself. The “weaving” gets interrupted and allows for ideas such as  the Sun alone being responsible for all life on Earth. One thread alone  makes no weaving, though. 



Copyright Andrea Hofman, Fribourg, Switzerland, 2019